>

Damir Esenaliev joins ISDC

Dr Damir Esenaliev joined ISDC as a Senior Researcher in January 2019. He brings topical expertise on peace-building, social cohesion, human development, labor markets, inequality, and rural development, and regional expertise in Central Asian and transition economies. Damir also has extensive experience designing and conducting panel data collection and impact evaluations. He will continue his role as the Academic Coordinator of the Life in Kyrgyzstan Study.

He has published in Journal of Comparative Economics, Economics of Transition, Social Indicators Research, and International Journal of Psychology. In addition, he has a number of working papers and reports published at DIW Berlin, IZA, University of Central Asia, and the World Bank.

Previously, he worked at the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin), the World Bank office in the Kyrgyz Republic, and the National (Central) Bank of the Kyrgyz Republic.

Damir holds a PhD degree in Economics from Humboldt-University of Berlin and he obtained his Master’s degree in Development Economics from Williams College (USA).

Continue Reading:

Third Workshop on Measuring Violent Conflict in Household Surveys

ISDC researchers provided training at the third “Measuring Violent Conflict in Household Surveys” workshop, held on 26-30 November in Perugia, Italy, as part of a workshop series organized by the World Bank. The participants included staff from National Statistical Offices (NSOs) in sub-Saharan Africa, including Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Ethiopia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, and Zimbabwe. The instructors included staff from […]

Call for Papers: 15th Annual HiCN Workshop “New Methods in Empirical Conflict Research”

In the last 15 years, civil conflict has gradually become an important subject of study for empirical economists. As a result, conflict research has adopted many empirical methods from mainstream economics. Furthermore, there is now a broad consensus that violent political conflict and economic development are intertwined, and a fast-growing literature studies this relationship with micro-data. At the same time, applied research on conflict is increasingly embracing new empirical methods, such as RCTs, geospatial analysis using high-resolution satellite imagery, machine learning methods, big data applications, and the large-scale digitization of archival resources. Each of these research tools has strengths and limitations and is the subject of ongoing methodological debates.

Simple statistical tools fail to describe jobs well in developing countries, new research by Damir Esenaliev and Neil Ferguson shows

In November 2018, Social Indicators Research published an original research article by Damir Esenaliev and Neil Ferguson on the relationship between good jobs and personal wellbeing. This study is one of the first conducted in a development context that looks beyond simple measures of job quality suggested by the classical labour supply model. This research […]