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ISDC Research Featured in 2019 Rural Development Report

New research on how rural youth experience political violence, conducted by Ghassan Baliki (Senior Researcher at ISDC), Tilman Brück (Director at ISDC), Neil Ferguson (Senior Researcher at ISDC) and Wolfgang Stojetz (Senior Researcher at ISDC) has been highlighted in the 2019 edition of IFAD’s Rural Development Report, “Creating Opportunities for Rural Youth”. The research shows that rural youth are disproportionately affected by conflict, with at least 350 million, per year, living in countries that are affected by conflict. In turn, already constrained rural young people are more likely to face adversities associated with conflict than other groups. In particular, education accumulation, transition to employment and career development are likely to be further harmed. The background paper can be found here.

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Assets For Alimentation? The Nutritional Impact Of Assets-Based Programming In Niger

A new paper by Tilman Brück, O.M. Dias Botia, N. T. N. Ferguson, J. Ouédraogo and Z. Ziegelhoefer titled “Assets For Alimentation? The Nutritional Impact Of Assets-Based Programming In Niger” has been published in the UNICEF – Innocenti Working Papers Series. A recent strand of aid programming aims to develop household assets by removing the stresses associated […]

Tilman Brück speaking at the Colombia Day at ZALF

Tilman Brück delivered a keynote speech on 24 May 2019 at the Colombia Day at ZALF (Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research). The workshop brought together Colombian and German experts for economic development, land use and peacebuilding. Tilman stressed the role of inequality in the postwar period, which can contribute to a resurgence of grievances and violence. […]

New Publication on Gender Earnings Inequality and Wage Policy in Kyrgyzstan published in Comparative Economic Studies

New paper by Damir Esenaliev and Kathryn H. Anderson on gender earnings inequality and wage policy in Kyrgyzstan has been published in Comparative Economic Studies. The findings show that the policy reform conducted in 2011 to increase the wages for teachers, health and social workers not only reduced wage gap in these sectors compared to non-reformed sectors, but also had a pronounced gender gap narrowing effect in the reform sectors and economy-wide.