ISDC Research Featured in 2019 Rural Development Report

New research on how rural youth experience political violence, conducted by Ghassan Baliki (Senior Researcher at ISDC), Tilman Brück (Director at ISDC), Neil Ferguson (Senior Researcher at ISDC) and Wolfgang Stojetz (Senior Researcher at ISDC) has been highlighted in the 2019 edition of IFAD’s Rural Development Report, “Creating Opportunities for Rural Youth”. The research shows that rural youth are disproportionately affected by conflict, with at least 350 million, per year, living in countries that are affected by conflict. In turn, already constrained rural young people are more likely to face adversities associated with conflict than other groups. In particular, education accumulation, transition to employment and career development are likely to be further harmed. The background paper can be found here.

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Laura Peitz among the winners of the PhD research paper award

Laura Peitz is among the winners of the Dahrendorf Forum PhD Research Paper Award. Her paper Too Many Cooks Don’t Spoil the Broth? – Bridging Literatures on Private Sector Engagement in Sustainable Development (working title) examines how research relevant to private sector engagement in sustainable development is currently conducted disconnectedly in various disciplines and programmes and discusses the […]

Tilman Brück speaking at the Colombia Day at ZALF

Tilman Brück delivered a keynote speech on 24 May 2019 at the Colombia Day at ZALF (Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research). The workshop brought together Colombian and German experts for economic development, land use and peacebuilding. Tilman stressed the role of inequality in the postwar period, which can contribute to a resurgence of grievances and violence. […]

Press Release: “Can jobs programs build peace?” New paper highlights the need to strengthen evidence in development aid spending.

“Can jobs programs build peace?” has been published in the peer-reviewed journal “World Bank Research Observer”. This review of why jobs programs might build peace and whether or not they do is the result of collaboration between ISDC and Valeria Izzi, with support from ILO, PBSO, UNDP and the World Bank. The article highlights strong social science theories that link employment programs and peace but scant real world evidence that programs have successfully delivered this promise. Until such a link and its mechanisms can be robustly established, simply running good jobs programs in the difficult situations that require peacebuilding probably makes more sense.