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Lebanon must learn from the Syrian disaster

In their latest op-ed, Tilman Brück and Mounir Mahmalat argue that overlapping crises are threatening the political, economic and social stability of Lebanon. As this column explains, the disaster in Syria provides insights into how grievances can accumulate to a point at which single events can trigger conflict.

  • Elites in Lebanon must commit to a new reform agenda to increase citizens’ trust in its government, including taking on corruption and abuse of public offices.
  • Strong and universal social safety nets must decrease the dependency of citizens on communal elites.
  • International actors need to learn from past experiences by proposing aid and support programmes contingent on a set of reforms that are actually implementable and generate a purpose for citizens’ struggle.

Full article can be accessed here.

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Call for Papers: 15th Annual HiCN Workshop “New Methods in Empirical Conflict Research”

In the last 15 years, civil conflict has gradually become an important subject of study for empirical economists. As a result, conflict research has adopted many empirical methods from mainstream economics. Furthermore, there is now a broad consensus that violent political conflict and economic development are intertwined, and a fast-growing literature studies this relationship with micro-data. At the same time, applied research on conflict is increasingly embracing new empirical methods, such as RCTs, geospatial analysis using high-resolution satellite imagery, machine learning methods, big data applications, and the large-scale digitization of archival resources. Each of these research tools has strengths and limitations and is the subject of ongoing methodological debates.

New ISDC-led Research on Jobs for Peace and Stability Published

Neil Ferguson, Senior Researcher at ISDC, Eleonora Nillesen, Research Affiliate at ISDC and Professor of Economics at UNU-MERIT, and Tilman Brück, Director of ISDC, have published new research on the relationships between jobs programmes and peace in the journal Economics Letters. The research, titled “Can employment build peace? A pseudo-meta-analysis of employment programmes in Africa” critically evaluates the […]