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Press Release: Life with Corona survey reveals shared global sentiments and stark generational divides

Older people worry less, Americans want priority access to vaccine – Global survey reveals generational and cultural differences in how we live with the pandemic

On Thursday, 1 October2020,the second round of the Life with Corona global survey is being launched, alongside a report covering key findings from six monthsof data collectionincluding:

  • Young adults actively perform many behaviours to counter the pandemic.
  • Stress infamilies during the pandemic falls disproportionately on women.
  • Older people worry less during the pandemic, despite being at greater health risk.
  • Support for government’s countermeasures drops after the first peak of COVID-related deaths in a country.
  • Overall, people think a vaccine should be made available globally. Only in the USA do more people think their county should have special access to it.
  • Younger people are more willing to pay to stop the spread of the disease than older people.

These findings come from analysis of nearly12,000 responses from more than 130 countries.

‘The coronavirus changedthe lives and livelihoods of billions of people worldwide, with an unprecedented speed and force. This is not just a medical pandemic – it is a social pandemic as well,’ says Professor Tilman Brück from ISDC – International Security and Development Center and the Leibniz Institute of Vegetable and Ornamental Crops, who initiated the Life with Corona survey.

‘Our lives are changing rapidly, fundamentally and permanently. New lines of conflicts within families, between generations and between countries are emerging. Even if we defeat the virus soon, its legacy will shape our societies for a long time,in complex ways. We document these changes in real time,’ adds Dr Wolfgang Stojetz, from ISDC – International Security and Development Center and Head of Data & Analysis of the Life with Coronasurvey.

‘Our analysis shows how comprehensive the social, economic and psychological impacts of the pandemic are, in developed and developing economies alike,’ says Professor Patricia Justino from United Nations University World Institute for Development Economics Research (UNU-WIDER). ‘The Life with Coronasurvey allows us see how the pandemic affects the way people all over the world relate to each otheras the pandemic unfolds.’

‘This pandemic, and the policy responses we’ve seen around the world, has highlighted how little we know about how people cope in a global crisis. The impacts are felt beyond the health sector or the economy, each individual has had to change the way they live. As researchers we want to learn how people react and respond in this extraordinary time,’ says Professor Anke Hoeffler from the University of Konstanz.

The second round of the survey, launching today,1 October2020, will grow the reach and breadth of the research, expanding the global dataset on the impacts of COVID-19.

Participation in this survey is essential for research and informed policy-making, and the researchers hope citizens around the world will take 15 minutes to share their experience in the name of science.

The project is run by an international research consortium, including ISDC – International Security and Development Center, United Nations University World Institute for Development Economics Research (UNU-WIDER),Leibniz-Institut für Gemüse- und Zierpflanzenbau (IGZ), the University of Konstanz,and the Institute for Development Studies (IDS). It is also supported by various volunteers and a network of collaborating organizations and institutions from around the world.

The survey can be accessed in 18 languages at lifewithcorona.org, with more languages being added in the next few weeks.

For interviews with Professors Brück, Justino, or Hoeffler or for information on the project, please contact:

Eeva Nyyssönen, nyyssonen@wider.unu.edu

Or

Ruby Richardson, richardson@wider.unu.edu

+358 (0)961599257

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