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Special Section at World Development: Food Security and Violent Conflict

A special section on quantitative analysis of conflict and food security has been published at World Development: Vol 119, Pages 1-234 (July 2019). In an open access introduction to the section, titled Food security and violent conflict: Introduction to the special issue, Tilman Brück and Marco d’Errico highlight the following points:

  • Food insecurity and violent conflict are global challenges and causally linked to each other in many ways.
  • Little is known about how to design effective policies to help households escape combined conflict-hunger traps.
  • Better data at the micro-level will provide a large boost to much needed research in this field.
The article provides a brief survey over key themes in the quantitative literature on this nexus and focuses on the micro-level, the role of conflict type, heterogeneity, resilience, and humanitarian crises.

 

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