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Tilman Brück speaking at the Colombia Day at ZALF

Tilman Brück delivered a keynote speech on 24 May 2019 at the Colombia Day at ZALF (Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research). The workshop brought together Colombian and German experts for economic development, land use and peacebuilding. Tilman stressed the role of inequality in the postwar period, which can contribute to a resurgence of grievances and violence. More information in this research can be found here.

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Call for Papers: Annual ‘Life in Kyrgyzstan’ Conference

Institute of Public Policy and Administration of the University of Central Asia (UCA), Leibniz Institute of Vegetable and Ornamental Crops (IGZ), and International Security and Development Center (ISDC), are pleased to announce the next fourth annual ‘Life in Kyrgyzstan’ Conference to take place in Bishkek on 17-18 October 2018. The two-day conference will bring together national and international […]

Tilman Brück and Angela Merkel speaking at a panel discussion of the German Catholic Convention

Tilman Brück was a speaker at the panel discussion “Germany in the Changing World: What can be done about conflict spots and aggressive regimes?” of the German Catholic Convention (Katholikentag). Among other speakers of the discussion were Angela Merkel, Chancellor of Germany, and Cardinal Peter Turkson. The discussion took place in Münster on 11 May 2018. Please see […]

Call for Papers: 15th Annual HiCN Workshop “New Methods in Empirical Conflict Research”

In the last 15 years, civil conflict has gradually become an important subject of study for empirical economists. As a result, conflict research has adopted many empirical methods from mainstream economics. Furthermore, there is now a broad consensus that violent political conflict and economic development are intertwined, and a fast-growing literature studies this relationship with micro-data. At the same time, applied research on conflict is increasingly embracing new empirical methods, such as RCTs, geospatial analysis using high-resolution satellite imagery, machine learning methods, big data applications, and the large-scale digitization of archival resources. Each of these research tools has strengths and limitations and is the subject of ongoing methodological debates.