Tilman Brück

The Cost of Talking Peace

Funding aspects are a key issue in peace negotiation and mediation processes (referred to as peace negotiations in shorthand). Yet, their role and implications are insuf ciently understood. Funding for peace negotiations is often treated as a purely technical issue. However, on closer inspection, funding is fundamentally political and, as such, has a profound impact […]

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The Cost of Talking Peace: Financing peace negotiation and mediation processes

Peace negotiation and mediation processes are standard approaches to ending armed conflicts. While the international system has put norms, structures and capacities in place to support these processes, how they are financed has not undergone a similar transformation. Funding is perceived as purely technical, though it is political in its implications and often complex in its […]

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New Working Paper: Trust in the Time of Corona

A new working paper has been published using the data from a new global Life with Corona survey. Tilman Brück, Neil Ferguson, Patricia Justino and Wolfgang Stojetz explore how trust correlates with the individual experiences of the pandemic. The authors show that those who have had contact with sick people and those that are unemployed show lower […]

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Trust in the Time of Corona

We focus on one pillar of society—trust—and explore how trust correlates with the individual experiences of the pandemic. We show that those who have had contact with sick people and those that are unemployed exhibit lower trust in people, institutions, and in general.

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Addressing the challenges of the forcibly displaced and their host communities in the ESCWA region

This project will address the long-term development challenges associated with the forced displacement that is a result, particularly, of the Syrian conflict, but also of other conflicts that have occurred or are on-going in the ESCWA region. In doing so, the project will support a track-II style process led by ESCWA with intellectual inputs. The […]

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The Micro-level Analysis of the Impact of Violent Conflict on Lives and Livelihoods in the MENA Region

The MENA region is characterized by several interrelated socio-economic trends including rapidly growing populations, on average high degrees of (youth) unemployment, strong gender differences in terms of labor market participation, and political radicalization. The countries in the region often have weak and/or authoritarian central government institutions, declining public revenues from natural resources except in a […]

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Lebanon must learn from the Syrian disaster

In their latest op-ed, Tilman Brück and Mounir Mahmalat argue that overlapping crises are threatening the political, economic and social stability of Lebanon. As this column explains, the disaster in Syria provides insights into how grievances can accumulate to a point at which single events can trigger conflict. Elites in Lebanon must commit to a new […]

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Tilman Brück appointed Professor of Food Security, State Fragility and Climate Change at the University of Greenwich

Tilman Brück has been appointed Professor of Food Security, State Fragility and Climate Change at the Natural Resources Institute of the University of Greenwich. Tilman’s appointment at the NRI strengthens ISDC’s international networks and opens new collaborations for the analysis of how weak institutions, shocks and climate change shape lives and livelihoods around the world.

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“Rural youth in the context of fragility and conflict” published as part of IFAD Research Series

Research by Ghassan Baliki, Tilman Brück, Neil Ferguson and Wolfgang Stojetz on rural youth in the context of fragility and conflict has been published as 54 IFAD Research Series Issue.  The paper was originally commissioned as a background paper for the 2019 Rural Development Report: Creating opportunities for rural youth. While conflicts are often defined […]

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Call for Papers: Leibniz Environment and Development Symposium (LEADS) 2020

We hereby invite you to join the next LEADS event in Berlin onMarch 9-10, 2020. We invite submissions of original and unpublished research papers that address at least one of the above mentioned societal challenges. Weprefer empirical papers addressing questions at the intersection of socio-economics, ecological and technical studies- and we prefer receiving complete drafts of papers.

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Leibniz Environment and Development Symposium (LEADS) 2020

Global societal challenges such as climate change, the loss of biodiversityand nature’s contributions to people, food security for all, decreasing social inequalities and preventing and overcoming violent conflicts require strong interdisciplinary and international research collaboration. Research at the interface of environment and development is often hampered by traditional academic boundaries. New ideas and fresh research […]

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Long-term behavioural impact of an integrated home garden intervention: evidence from Bangladesh

Integrated home garden interventions combine training in gardening practices with education about nutrition knowledge. Such interventions have been shown to improve nutrition behaviour in low income countries. However, to date rigorous evidence is lacking for their long-term impact. We test the impact of an integrated home garden intervention on vegetable production and consumption three years […]

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Return Migration and Self Employment: Evidence from Kyrgyzstan

A common finding of the migration literature is that migrants are more likely to choose self-employment upon return to their origin countries than non-migrants. This has led to the belief that return migration stimulates entrepreneurship in source countries and hence supports economic development. In this paper, we test these assertions, drawing on the Life in […]

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Social Protection in Contexts of Fragility and Forced Displacement: Introduction to a Special Issue

Effective social protection is increasingly as essential to supporting affected populations in situations of protracted instability and displacement. Despite the growing use of social protection in these settings, there is comparatively little rigorous research on what works, for whom, and why. This special issue contributes by adding seven high-quality studies that raise substantially our understanding […]

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