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New Article: Can rigorous impact evaluations improve humanitarian assistance?

A new study by J. Puri, A. Aladysheva, V. Iversen, Y. Ghorpade and T. Brück has been published in  Journal of Development Effectiveness under the title “Can rigorous impact evaluations improve humanitarian assistance?”. The article reflects on the challenges of rigorous impact evaluations of humanitarian assistance. The authors find that theory-based impact evaluations can crucially inform humanitarian programming. However, popular methods, such as orthodox RCTs, are seen as less suitable. The study explains that factorial designs and quasi-experimental designs can be ethical and robust, answering questions about how to improve the delivery of assistance. The authors argue that it helps to be prepared, planning impact evaluations before the onset of emergencies. The article can be accessed here.

 

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Damir Esenaliev co-authored ADB’s Country Diagnostic Study for the Kyrgyz Republic

Dr Damir Esenaliev of ISDC has co-authored a chapter on Human Resources for Inclusive Growth in ADB’s Country Diagnostic Study for the Kyrgyz Republic. The study is an in-depth analysis of the sector reforms needed to enable the Kyrgyz Republic to achieve higher and more sustainable economic growth. The chapter presents an analysis of the recent developments in the labor market, […]

Money Can’t Buy Love But Can it Buy Peace?

Tilman Brück’s and Neil Ferguson’s letter to the Editor on the peace process in Northern Ireland has been published in the Economist. The letter refers to their study “Money Can’t Buy Love But Can it Buy Peace? Evidence from the EU Programme for Peace and Reconciliation” that looked at the second wave of PEACE programmes and […]

Money Can’t Buy Love but Can it Buy Peace? Evidence from Northern Ireland

Tilman Brück and Neil Ferguson published a working paper on the effectiveness of a large-scale peace-building programme in Northern Ireland. In 1998, the Good Friday Agreement concluded a period of violence in Northern Ireland yet the scars of the conflict remained prevalent in the political landscape. Rival communities remained divided, economic performance was poor and intercommunity […]